I love photography as a hobby and I enjoy sharing my photos, many  from right here at the Jersey Shore. I hope you enjoy taking some time to relax as I share my visions with you ~ Shawn Michaels
Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

Took this shot from far-away with a zoom lens. Obviously this bird has no fear of heights or electricity ... perched high up on this utility poll.

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

The dome high a-top the Tuckerton Seaport.

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

This shot happened very fast and was not ready to zoom in for a closer look, but these cardinals look so cool sitting in their tree with the snowy back-drop. I'm a much bigger fan of these "cardinals" as opposed to the St. Louis and/or Arizona ones !

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

Most abandoned factories are found at the ends of dirty old streets, often next to foul urban waterways or unused railroad yards. The Crab Island Fish Factory is an exception. It sits on its own island in New Jersey’s Great Bay, the only stain on a landscape that seems remote and almost untouched by humans. The factory was built in the 1800’s to turn an inedible type of fish called a bunker, or a menhaden, into an assortment of products, such as fish oil, fertilizer, and pet food. Locally, the factory was known as “the stink house”, due to the awful smell it would emit when it was in operation. The factory brought fishing in the area to an industrial scale. Bunker/menhaden travel in huge schools, which would be spotted from above by airplanes. The planes would then direct boats to surround the school with nets, catching thousands of fish with very little time and effort. Eventually, the factory’s efficiency led to its own downfall, as it dragged the once enormous bunker/menhaden population lower and lower, until there simply weren’t enough fish left to catch and still make a profit. It also had to ship product to the railroads, which were all a great distance from its remote island. After failing in its original purpose, and overusing the resource that it had thrived on, the factory still clung on to life by composting garbage from nearby Atlantic City. In the 1970’s, the factory’s atrocities towards nature ended when it became a part of the Green Acres program. Today, the factory has been reclaimed by nature, it’s warehouses are home to seabirds and its piers (ironically) shelter huge schools of small fish.

 

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

This is my favorite shot of the month! The Great Egret in flight......

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

The great egret can be distinguished from other white egrets by its yellow billand black legs and feet. It has a slow flight, with its neck retracted. The great egret is not normally a vocal bird; it gives a low hoarse croak when disturbed, and at breeding colonies, it often gives a loud croaking cuk cuk cuk and higher-pitched squawks.

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

 

Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media
The Moon in April is known as the “Egg Moon”, “Grass Moon”, and the “Hare Moon”
Shawn Michaels, Townsquare Media

Red Rock Canyon in Nevada

Hope You enjoyed this months "Shutterblog" tell me which one is your favorite, comment below.