A woman in New Jersey has been using Instagram to sell fake COVID-19 vaccination cards but she didn't stop there...

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At least 10 people also took her up on her enhanced package of also entering their personal information into the New York State Immunization Information System database showing that they had both vaccines.  This operation was in all intents and purposes an actual anti-vax ring with at least 15 people allegedly involved in the conspiracy.

The ring leader is Jasmine Clifford, a Lyndhurst woman who sold over 250 forged COVID-19 vaccination cards on Instagram.  Some of these people wanted the upgraded package of also getting their information added to the New York database and yes, that was extra.

Jasmine Clifford has been charged in a Criminal Court complaint with offering a false instrument for filing in the first degree, conspiracy in the fifth degree as well as being charged with criminal possession of a forged instrument in the second degree.  I'm not a lawyer but that doesn't sound good. I mean she only charged $200 per card is that worth prison time? Risk vs reward lady, risk vs reward...

The New Jersey woman is a  "self-described entrepreneur with several online businesses," I bet authorities will be looking into those pretty quickly as a bonus.  I mean, do she think that she wouldn't get caught when she was advertising her services online?  For crying out loud her handle is even @AntiVaxMomma (not leaving much room for denying that she was bragging that she can get forged Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 vaccination cards to you)  Everything the feds needed was on her Instagram account a.k.a a silver platter.

She charged $200 for the fake cards, and, for an additional fee, her friend at a medical clinic in Patchogue, New York, would enter the "customer's" name into the NYSIIS database showing that they got their COVID-19 vaccinations.  Wow...those are some huge hoops to jump through to avoid the vaccine.  You can read more about it here.

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

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