It's estimated that nearly all victims of domestic violence are also suffering financial hardship.

These survivors, and their children, are the sole focus of a winter clothing drive running through Dec. 10 at dozens of New Jersey locations.

Sami Sarkis, Getty Images

The Allstate Foundation is seeking donations from the public — whether you're a customer or not — at more than 250 agency locations in the Northeast, 50 of which can be found in New Jersey.

"What we're looking for is donations of new winter clothing — hats, gloves, scarves, coats," said Ed Cook, senior manager for corporate relations at Allstate New Jersey. "The primary need is winter clothing for women and children, but clothing for men is also accepted."

And for every participating New Jersey agency owner, the foundation is providing a $1,000 grant to the National Network to End Domestic Violence, which will eventually make its way to the individual state chapters.

Every item donated in New Jersey will stay in the state.

Angela Campos, economic justice coordinator for the New Jersey Coalition to End Domestic Violence, said donations will be distributed to 30 programs throughout New Jersey, such as emergency shelters, transitional housing programs and community outreach programs.

"A coat is a very expensive thing to purchase," Campos said. "Economic abuse impacts 94 to 99 percent of domestic violence victims."

According to statistics provided by NJCEDV, using data from the state's 22 state-funded domestic violence agencies, about 1,500 victims of domestic violence, and about the same number of children, resided in emergency shelters in New Jersey at some point during 2016.

Another 1,300-plus individuals resided in domestic violence transitional housing programs throughout the Garden State.

More than 90,000 hotline calls were received, and more than 12,000 victims received non-residential services such as counseling.

For the past year and a half, Allstate has funded the coalition's program that offers remote career and financial planning services to domestic violence survivors.

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