It is heading towards nice weather, extra hours of daylight with beautiful sunrises and sunsets across Ocean County but one place where you can enjoy such views won't be available for some time.

The Barnegat Lighthouse will be closed to visitors for seven months as the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection begins a $1.3 million restoration of the historic lighthouse, DEP Commissioner Shawn M. LaTourette announced on Friday.

You'll have this weekend to get your final sights in as the lighthouse will close on Monday March 14 for construction work that is scheduled to last through the month of October.

The NJ-DEP says the restoration project of the Barnegat Lighthouse will include a complete exterior restoration of the lighthouse, masonry recoating and repairs to the brick facade, interior lantern steel platform repairs, roof repairs, and the installation of new windows.

While the lighthouse itself will be off limits, Barnegat Lighthouse State Park will remain open.

“For 165 years the Barnegat Lighthouse has stood as an important beacon to sailors, ships, and Jersey shore visitors,” Commissioner LaTourette said in a written statement. “This critical restorative work will ensure that the historic lighthouse remains a bright and welcoming landmark for future generations.”

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You won't be able to see the light either as the NJ-DEP said the lighthouse will remain dark during the project for the second time since 2009 which was when the Friends of Barnegat Lighthouse donated the current light that's in there.

The originial lighting at the lighthouse took place in 1859, three years after construction in 1856, and was decommissioned in 1927, which is why it sat dark until 2009.

The Friends of Barnegat Lighthouse will once again donate a new beacon light for the lighthouse along with new security fencing as well.

While the project is underway, there will also be scaffolding put up for the entire height of the lighthouse.

“While the lighthouse will be closed to visitors, Barnegat Lighthouse State Park will continue to be open for fishing, hiking, birding, and picnicking,” John Cecil, Assistant Commissioner for State Parks, Forests & Historic Sites, said in a written statement. “The park office, interpretive center, fisherman’s walkway, and trails also will remain open for guests to enjoy.”

If you're still looking to climb a lighthouse or two along the Jersey Shore, you can visit one of the State Park Service’s other lighthouses, the NJ-DEP suggested, including Twin Lights Historic Site in Highlands, Absecon Lighthouse in Atlantic City, or the Cape May Lighthouse in Cape May Point.

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