So it is December and Christmas is fast approaching and we have heard many tunes singing about snow and a "white" Christmas...so do we want snow this week here in Ocean County?

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Usually in December New Jersey averages about 5.1 inches according to NJWEATHER. Usually, we see less to the south with Monmouth County seeing more of the white stuff than here in Ocean County. In addition...According to the Northeast Regional Climate Center, New Jersey statistically only has about a 16% chance of seeing at least an inch of snow during the Christmas holiday.

 

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So our question for you Do You Want To See Snow This Week? Vote In Our Poll Below ....

 

 

Dan Zarrow is saying we do have a chance at snow Wednesday here in New Jersey. At this time Chief Meteorologist Dan Zarrow is calling for "CLOUDY AND COLD... CHANCE OF LIGHT SNOW, FROM ABOUT MID-MORNING THROUGH MID-AFTERNOON... A COATING TO AN INCH OF ACCUMULATION IS POSSIBLE, ESPECIALLY FOR INLAND OCEAN COUNTY... SOME MIXING WITH RAIN MAY OCCUR ALONG THE IMMEDIATE COAST... HIGH 38" That's Dan's call for Wednesday, be sure to download the 92.7 WOBM App to get the latest weather, alerts, and Stormwatch for any closings or cancellations. Stay up to date this winter with 92.7 WOBM

Personally, I like a coating of snow around Christmas, it always adds to the holiday mood when we have a bit of snow around Christmas. I don't want a Christmas blizzard lol just a touch from "Jack Frost" and I am good.....so we will see if we get our first accumulating snow this week.

 

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