The pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will remain in effect for at least a little while longer.

A special federal advisory panel on Wednesday requested more data as they continue to review a handful of cases involving women who developed unusual blood clots after getting the New Jersey company's vaccine.

They’re trying to determine if the clots were linked to the shot, and if so, how significant the risk is.

In the meantime, New Jersey health officials are working with vaccine distribution centers. to preserve their inventory of the J&J shots.

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Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli said state officials don't know whether more Pfizer or Moderna shipments will be sent to make up for the difference.

Persichilli said some vaccine distribution locations are re-scheduling or postponing appointments but “most sites get a mix of vaccine types, so many are able to switch to either Pfizer or Moderna for their appointments.”

She said more than 146,000 doses of J&J vaccine was recently been delivered to supermarket pharmacies, federally qualified health centers, hospitals, megasites and  health departments.

She noted the state Health Department is working with vaccine sites and local health departments that only give the J&J vaccine to help them switch appointments to other locations.

She said while the pause has caused some New Jerseyans to feel hesitant about getting a COVID vaccine, “we are encouraging residents to keep their vaccine appointments for the Moderna and Pfizer vaccine, which have been demonstrated to be safe and effective.”

She noted 47,266 women in the Garden State between the ages of 18 and 48 (the age range of the six women who have had a blot clot problems) have received the J&J shot, and none of them have reported having a clotting problem.

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