It's the time of year when we all like to spend as much time as possible outside. This summer, especially after being cooped up for so long. With the great outdoors comes pests like mosquitos. New Jersey should be on alert as a rare virus carried by mosquitos has been detected in the Garden State.

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According to the CDC, the Jamestown Canyon virus is spread to people by infected mosquitoes. While the virus is found throughout much of the United States, most cases are reported from the upper Midwest and occur most often from late spring through mid-fall.

Fever, headache, and fatigue are common symptoms of Jamestown Canyon virus disease. Jamestown Canyon virus can be severe with the risk of encephalitis, or infection of the brain, or meningitis, the infection of the lining of the brain.

Currently, there are no vaccines to prevent or medicines to treat Jamestown Canyon virus infection. The only way to reduce your risk of infection is to avoid mosquito bites.

NJ.com has reported that a man from Sussex County in his 60s has tested positive for the infection. This is the first case in nearly six years. This man first developed a fever and then had neurological symptoms.

In a statement made Wednesday, New Jersey Health Commissioner Judith Persichilli said:

When enjoying the outdoors, remember to use an EPA-registered insect repellent, cover skin with clothing when you can, and check yourself and your pets for ticks and quickly remove them with tweezers.

I share this information not to scare you, but make you aware. Simple, common-sense precautions should keep you happy and healthy this summer.

Even with the mosquitos, we love NJ. LOOK: Here are the 25 best places to live in New Jersey

Stacker compiled a list of the best places to live in New Jersey using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, health care, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs, and towns were included. Listings and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there's a robust mix of offerings from great schools and nightlife to high walkability and public parks. Some areas have enjoyed rapid growth thanks to new businesses moving to the area, while others offer glimpses into area history with well-preserved architecture and museums. Keep reading to see if your hometown made the list.