NEWARK — The Archdiocese of Newark on Wednesday released a list of 63 clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse of minors dating back to 1940.

The list of at healing.rcan.org includes the name of the clergy, their assignment while with the Archdiocese, how many victims they are accused of assaulting and their current status. Most of those on the list are deceased.

The list was posted on the websites of all the New Jersey dioceses in Camden, Metuchen, Newark, Paterson, and Trenton.

The list also includes former Archbishop Theodore McCarrick because of allegations made based on an investigation by the Archdiocese of New York, according to a note accompanying his name.

Clergy were told on Tuesday at a meeting at the Archdiocese that the list was coming.

In a statement, Cardinal Jozeph Tobin said the list was the result of an "extensive review" of Archdiocesan records dating back to 1940 and an effort to do what is "right and just."

 

"It is our sincerest hope that this disclosure will help bring healing to those whose lives have been so deeply violated. We also pray that this can serve as an initial step in our efforts to help restore trust in the leadership of the Catholic Church," Tobin said.

Tobin said the release of the list does not represent an endpoint in the process of dealing with abuse in the church.

"Moving forward, vigilance must be maintained. We all must be committed to protecting our children, the most vulnerable members of our community," Tobin said.

The release of the names comes as the dioceses announced the Independent Victim Compensation Fund for victims of sexual abuse. Tobin said the fund would allow those abused by priests when they were minors "to seek financial compensation in a compassionate, expeditious, independent, and transparent manner."

The fund will be administered by Kenneth R. Feinberg and Camille S. Biros, administrators of the compensation funds created for victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack and the Boston Marathon bombing.

Further lists from other dioceses are expected today as well.

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