TOMS RIVER — In the wake of the shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida last month there have been numerous protests drawing millions of people throughout the nation, and the globe, demanding legislative action on guns.

The shooting also sparked debates throughout the country on whether or not schools are adequately protected from gun violence, and whether or not teachers or professors should carry weapons while on campus.

The argument for teachers carrying weapons was first coined by President Trump while he talking with victims of the shooting in Parkland and their family members. The hot-button issue was put to a poll by NJ1015.com and the response was split, but more in favor of teachers carrying weapons 55% to 45%.

So, the question remains: are students safe from gun violence while they are at school?

In a survey of 345 students and staff published by The Viking News, Ocean County College's student-run newspaper, college students Jane Bowden, Joe LaBella, and George Galesky found what the mood about The Gun Issue in America was:

Survey Breakdown:

  • 345 students and staff members participated.
    • 66% of the respondents were under the age of 25.
    • 22% of the respondents were between the ages of 21 and 25.
    • 12% of the respondents were over the age of 26.

According to the survey, 70% of the respondents said that they did not have a gun their household, while 30% of the respondents stated that they did, in fact, have a gun in their household. When asked about owning a gun, about 90% of the respondents said that they did not, while 10% said that they did own a gun. 24% of students said that they either knew someone or where a victim of gun-related violence in the past.

Respondents of the survey did not match with the polling done by New Jersey 101.5, as 38% of respondents strongly disagreed with the notion of teachers and professors being armed, while 17% strongly agreed, and 23% were neutral on the issue.

According to polling published by Gallup, 60% of people in the United States of America believe that there should be stricter laws on the books when it comes to guns. The same poll indicated that a majority of Americans, 56%, would like to reinstate and strengthen the ban on assault weapons that was in place from 1994 to 2004.

When asked whether or not assault weapons should be banned in the United States, 44% of Ocean County College respondents either said that they would strongly agree or agree with a ban, 23% are neutral on the issue and 32% said that they would disagree or strongly disagree with a ban on assault weapons.

Follow The Viking News on Twitter: @VikingNewsOCC