Millennials are no good at keeping secrets, at least when it comes to how much money they make at work.


According to personal finance website The Cashlorette, young adults are willing to share their salaries with others at much higher rates than any other generation.

Nearly a third of adults aged 18 to 36 in the website's survey admitted to sharing their salary with a co-worker. Only 8 percent of Baby Boomers have spilled the same details to a colleague. Boomers are also much less likely than Millennials to share their salary with an immediate family member or friend.

Reacting to the survey, business etiquette expert Barbara Pachter in Cherry Hill agreed Millennials are quicker to discuss this once-taboo topic. They're much more interested in sharing many things, as evidenced by social media.

Whether sharing this information in the workplace is right or wrong she could not say.

On the one hand, an employee could use the info to learn whether they're being paid fairly, or as ammo to work up the nerve to ask for a raise.

At the same time, one's salary is not always tied to just a title, and can depend on one's education and experience. Sharing salaries with one another, then, may only create tension moving forward.

“I’ve always worked in places that are competitive, and a lot of times people are paid differently even though they may have the same job title,” Melissa Manley, a 27-year-old working in nursing in New Jersey, told The Cashlorette. “The salaries or pay rates are often on a sliding scale, based on years worked, experience, job performance, et cetera. If a co-worker of mine found out that I make significantly more money than her even though we both do the exact same thing and she’s been working here longer, it will only cause animosity.”

Whether the topic comes up between colleagues, friends or family, Pachter said one could answer the sensitive question without revealing exactly how much they make.

"If you don't want to answer directly and say I make $70,000, you can say people in my company, or people in my profession with my amount of experience, they would make between $60,000 and $80,000," Pachter said. "You can give a range."

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